Home

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

Losing a Pet

This weekend, I lost my cat. It was sudden and unexpected. What was more unexpected was how difficult his loss would be. Anyone who has lost a beloved pet knows the grieving involved. Your constant companion is gone, leaving a void in your life. A usual errands-filled Saturday turned into one me immobile and stunned on the sofa, unable to believe he was gone.

The next day, I forced myself to open my laptop and work on the story I was writing, part of the Chateau Seductions series. Once I began to write, I lost myself in the story. For an hour or so, I escaped into the in the world I had created. My hero's grief at his loss was real as I wasn't just imagining how he was feeling, but actually experiencing those feelings myself.

I am trying to put into words something about how fiction allows us to escape, both for the reader and writer, but I can't seem to do it any justice right now. So I'll turn the question over to you. What do you think? As a reader or writer, does fiction help you cope with reality?

For a point of reference, the story I'm working on involves Antoine, who was introduced in Dark Velvet. A dark, tortured soul, which suits the writing mood.

~ Lisa

Lisa Carlisle
USA Today Bestselling Author of Romance and Suspense
Sign up for new releases and specials at
lisacarlislebooks.com

Connect with Lisa

Facebook - Twitter - Goodreads - Amazon - Pinterest

5 comments:

jean hart stewart said...

Fiction definitely helps me cope, Can't imagine getting through some spots without escaping to it. I think your solution have to come from your inner self, though. That's been formed somewhat by your reading.

Tina Donahue said...

I feel for you, Lisa - when I lost my cat, I cried. She was a sweetheart. A stray who adopted me. :)

Lisa Carlisle said...

Thank you. It's tough. He was always there when I read or wrote. I'm sure it will be better with time.

Fiona McGier said...

In a word? Yes. Many of the emotions my characters experience benefit from my own. Some scenes I've even cried while I wrote them, and each time I reread them. Those are the same ones that readers tell me moved them to tears also. Powerful emotions can be dealt with using words, though words are often inadequate to do justice to such power.

Lisa Carlisle said...

True. Thanks, Fiona.